Marigolds

Marigolds or Calendula officinalis, is a short-lived aromatic perennial that grows in warm, temperate regions of the world. Marigolds are native to southern Europe and southwestern Asia, although their long history of cultivation makes their origin unknown. Marigolds are easy to grow and versatile in the garden, making them a common favorite amongst home gardeners. 

Marigold florets are edible and are often added to dishes for their color in lieu of saffron. They can be used as a dye for fabric, foods and cosmetics. Our favorite use for Marigolds and their most prized attribute is the sticky, viscous oil distilled from the flower tops.  Calendula petals are full of flavonoids, which are naturally occurring substances in vegetables and fruits that give plants their bright colors.  As an oil, Marigolds can but used for health and wellness as it has tonic, sudorific, emmenagogic, and antispasmodic properties. However, it is most commonly used for skincare as it has great anti-inflammatory and vulnerary action making it a healing agent for wounds, acne, ulcers, bed sores, varicose veins, rashes, and eczema. 

Calendula Oil Benefits: 

Moisturizer for dry or chapped skin, soothing the area and reducing pain. Works well to relieve diaper rash. 

Anti-Inflammetry on swelling, sprained muscles or bruises. Helps treat spider veins, varicose veins, leg ulcers, and chilblains. 

Antiseptic & antimicrobial actions helps heal wounds, minor cuts, insect bites, acne, bed sores.

Antifungal properties treat athletes foot and ringworm 

Other skin issues like eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis can be sooth with Calendula oil. 

 

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How to Make Calendula Oil: 

You can create homemade calendula oil using the following instructions from Keeper of the Home

What you will need:

  • Dried calendula petals
  • Carrier oil (olive oil, almond oil, or sunflower oil are some great options)
  • A clean glass jar with a lid

There are two methods to infuse the oil:

  • Cold infusion method – This is the usually preferred techniques because it protects the delicate calendula from heat damage.
    1. Put your desired amount of dried calendula petals in a clean, dry glass jar.
    2. Fill the jar with your carrier oil of choice to cover the petals by an inch.
    3. Put in a sunny place to infuse for four weeks.
    4. Drain the petals from the oil and store the oil in a container with a lid for up to one year.
  • Hot infusion method – This method is much quicker than the cold infusion method but won't have the same strength because of the presence of heat.
    1. Put your desired amount of dried calendula petals in a clean, dry glass jar.
    2. Fill the jar with your carrier oil of choice to cover the petals by an inch.
    3. Dump the entire contents of the jar (the petals and the oil) in a small saucepan or slow cookers. Heat on low for four hours, stirring occasionally.
    4. Let cool. Drain the petals from the oil and store the oil in a container with a lid for up to one year.

You can use the homemade calendula oil as an after-bath body oil, salve,baby oil, lotion or home remedy for dry skin, inflamed areas, or rashes.

Kara Green